At-home Remedies To Stop Deep Acne Scars Before It Starts

When it comes to acne, a pimple reduced, is a scar prevented. That is, preventing the arrival of deep acne scars is a simple matter of controlling the size of a growing acne lesion.

Acne lesions like cysts, large pustules, papules and nodules notoriously leave behind indentations in the skin to mark their previous home. A large part of the skin damage created by large acne lesions results from inflammation and skin expansion that accompanies the acne healing process.

However, in three steps, you can control the inflammation and swelling that characterizes enlarged acne lesions and save your skin from deep acne scars.

Step 1: Displace swelling fluids

The easiest way to shrink a growing pimple is to displace the antibacterial fluids that the body creates in response to an acne lesion. You can help reduce the swelling resulting from inflammation by applying wet heat to the acne lesion.

To do this, place a damp wash cloth in the microwave for 60 seconds. Let the cloth cool for 10 seconds and then apply it to the pimple for one to two minutes. Repeat this heat treatment three times to help reduce the swelling of the acne lesion.

Another way to remove antibacterial fluids from a pimple is to apply tea tree oil to the inflamed lesion at night time. Throughout the night, the oil will seep into the skin and displace the antibacterial fluids surrounding the inflamed pimple. In the morning, the pimple should be smaller.

Step 2: Speed up the healing time with a mask

The longer an acne lesion remains in the skin, the more cosmetic damage it can inflict. To hasten a zits healing time, increase blood flow to the acne lesion. This increased blood flow transports a therapeutic envoy that includes skin cells, vitamins, enzymes and antimicrobial agents to the site of an inflamed pimple.

Applying a clay mask to the acne lesion increases blow flow to the sore as a the clay dries. Furthermore, the mask will draw away excess, inflammation-aggravating oils from the acne lesion, further reducing the papule’s size.

Step 3: Icing the swelling and reducing the pain

The intense pain an enlarged acne lesion incites serves as an indirect source of acne scarring. This excruciating pain increases an acne sufferer’s desire for immediate relief. You can soothe acne induced pain by icing your lesion. Just take an ice-cube from the freezer, and then wrap five sides of the cube with a paper towel. Massage the unwrapped side of the ice cube over the acne lesion for 30-60 seconds using circular movements.

Avoiding the temptation to extract a pimple when it has not yet reached a head- an exposed tip where all of the post-inflammation cellular waste resides- will help a pustule heal faster without leaving a deep scar. When the acne lesion does rise to a head, you can use a sterilized needle to puncture the head and release the debris inside the acne lesion.

Cleanse the area with a sanitizing wash afterwards. (Note: In some instances, embedded and long-term cysts should only be removed under medical supervision to avoid harmful side-effects.)

In short, whatever you can safely do to speed the healing time of an inflamed acne lesion reduces your chances of experiencing deep scars.

Copyright (c) 2007 Naweko Nicole Dial

Are Pistachios A Great Acne-preventing Snack

Pistachios contain the skin enriching nutrients vitamins A, C and E plus, zinc and folic acid. And now, new research from University of Toronto’s Department of Nutritional Sciences could add pistachios to a growing list of acne treatments that already includes benzoyl peroxide and antibiotics.

The study’s observations revealed that pistachios could help regulate the body’s blood sugar levels.

In addition to a diabetic therapy, pistachio’s effect on the body’s blood sugar levels also marks it as a potential acne preventative. Biological traits characterizing acne onset include improper skin cell shedding, inflammation and excess bacteria. However, because of a pistachio’s effect on blood sugar levels, this nut could prevent acne resulting from excess facial oil secretion caused by a rise in circulating androgens.

Therefore, pistachios could inhibit acne lesions induced by a condition known as “insulin resistance””insulin resistance”.

The relationship between acne and insulin resistance

The pancreas secretes the hormone insulin. The body needs insulin to access its primary energy source- blood sugar (glucose). Insulin binds to key receptors in the blood to release glucose as the body requires more energy.

Insulin resistance arises when the normal amount of insulin the pancreas secretes proves insufficient to signal the release of glucose. And, to compensate, the pancreas secretes more insulin in order to free the needed glucose.

Insulin resistance can incite acne lesions due to increased circulating androgens. Now, the Toronto study’s findings suggest that pistachios can curtail androgen surges caused by blood sugar fluctuations.

Pistachios act as a blood sugar regulator

Dr. Cyril Kendall, lead researcher of the study explained, “Our preliminary findings demonstrate that suppressing the glycemic (blood sugar) response of high carbohydrate foods may be part of the mechanism by which pistachios contribute to cardiovascular health and to the prevention and control of diabetes.”

Other scientists like Loren Cordain, PhD have noticed a link between insulin resistance and acne. In his work, “Implications for the Role of Diet in Acne”, Cordain writes, “Dietary interventions using low glycemic load carbohydrate may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of acne because of the beneficial endocrine effects these diets possess.”

Most acne treatments typically act on one or two symptoms such as surplus bacteria or clogged pores. Adding pistachios to the diet could help create a more robust acne therapy by also counteracting blood sugar shifts that produce excess oils and pimples.

Sources:

Cordain, Lorent. Implications for the Role of Diet in Acne. Semin Cutan Med Surg; 2005, vol 24, pp 84-91.

Eating Pistachios May Reduce the Impact of Carbohydrates on Blood Sugar Levels. Henson Consulting; Newswise. May 1, 2007.

Wijeyaratne, Chandrika N, Adam H Balen, Julian H Barth, Paul E Belchetz. Clinical manifestations and insulin resistance (IR) in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) among South Asians and Caucasians: is there a difference? Clinical Endocrinology; September 2002, vol 57, no 3, pp 343-350.

Copyright (c) 2007 Naweko Nicole Dial